4th Grade: Overview of Quarter 2, 2016-2017

“Your Digital Footprint, can be searched, shared, and seen by a large, invisible audience.” from Common Sense Media

Digital citizenship this quarter was understanding that we have a digital footprint. We learned that our digital footprint:

  • Includes things like-images, videos, sites, online programs, or to put it another way, any information you put online
  • It is permanent
  • Private information is not to be shared online
  • Always get permission to go online to use sites and programs
  • We used Tagxedo to create our Digital Footprints
    • Printed our Digital Footprint
    • Uploaded our Digital Footprint to our Technology folder in Google Drive

The concept of a digital storyboard was introduced this quarter.  A digital storyboard is a graphic organizer that is used to plan out and provide a sequence for digital projects.

4th Grade completed algorithm activities for the “Hour of Code” (code.org), an introduction to computer science for all ages. Hour of Code is a global event each year during December.

We learned that an algorithm is a set of rules or a process to be followed by the computer.   If you keep an algorithm simple there are lots of ways to use it. If you want to make sure everyone ends up with the same thing, then your algorithm needs more detail.

Lower School Video Highlights: The Hour of Code 2016 

Other skilled-based programs used this quarter were:

  • Typing Agent
  • IXL Math/Language Arts/Think Through Math
  • Wixie
  • BrainPop
  • SRI – Reading Inventory

Please visit our Lower School Resource Page (www2.ravenscroft.org/lowerschool) for home access all of our online programs!

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5th Grade Overview of Quarter 2, 2016/2017

Above: Video Highlights of all Grades & The Hour of Code 2016

Fifth graders continue to develop their Seesaw digital portfolio by adding links to project examples and reflections. We have completed adding language arts activities and a math and science presentation.

Digital citizenship was centered on private and personal information, website terms of use, and website privacy policies. Students learned how websites collect and share our information using:

  • Cookies
  • Web trackers/web beacons
  • Third parties
  • IP addresses

In addition, 5th grade completed the new Designer Minecraft Course during the “Hour of Code” (code.org) and made a “binary bracelet” using a binary decoder key.

Hour of Code is a global event in December that serves as an introduction to computer science. The Minecraft course included fourteen challenge levels using the following strategies and skills:

  • Understand a 2-D environment and how to survive in that environment
  • Use coding instructions to build, plant, care for animals, and overcome obstacles in the environment
  • Use opportunities within the course for free build and create a game
  • Understand sequences
  • Write algorithms – a list of steps to follow to complete a task
  • Use loops or repeated instructions
  • Debug, work backwards, and solve one piece of the error at a time
  • Use creative, logical, and computational thinking
  • Collaborate and communicate with others to move through the levels of the course
  • Practice digital citizenship

Other skilled-based programs used this quarter were:

  • Typing Agent keyboarding
  • IXL Math/Language arts/Quizlets
  • Google Apps
  • Wixie

Please visit our Lower School Resource Page (www2.ravenscroft.org/lowerschool) for home access to our online programs.

-Cindy Fordham

Cynthia Fordham
LS Instructional Technology
cynthia.fordham@ravenscroft.org

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LS Participates in “The Hour of Code”, December 2016

 Enjoy the following snapshots of Lower School and The Hour of Code
From…Ravenscroft Campus News and Events

Ravenscroft Students Participate in the National Hour of Code

Posted 12/15/2016 07:05PM – Article by: Mary Kornegay, Ravenscroft Communications

 “For the last five years, Ravenscroft has participated in the “Hour of Code,” a national campaign that is designed to “demystify coding,” introducing basic skills and broadening participation in the field of computer science. Millions of students in over 180 countries participated in the Hour of Code week this year from December 5th to 11th.

 Cindy Fordham, Lower School technology teacher, worked with students from kindergarten to 5th grade on a variety of digital projects. The students learned about coding and computer language through step-by-step courses that introduced vocabulary words and gave them a sense of what coding really means.

All students made their own “binary bracelets” to visually show how information is stored in a computer. Along with the bracelets, each grade level participated in age-appropriate activities that introduced coding. For example, first graders had to get a “fuzzy ball” through a maze using directional codes. Fourth graders were tasked with using tangram pieces to create a puzzle in Google Draw based on verbal commands from their partner. Fifth graders created a personal profile to encourage smart digital citizenship and carefully read through the privacy policies of popular games, like Pokemon Go and Minecraft.” Article by: Mary Kornegay

“The Hour of Code is a great opportunity for students to participate with other students across the world to learn about computer language,” said Fordham. “The students not only learn about code, but collaborate and help each other to finish their tasks. They learn patience and teamwork.”

To read more about the Hour of Code at Ravenscroft, click here.

“The Hour of Code is a global movement reaching tens of millions of students in 180+ countries. Anyone, anywhere can organize an Hour of Code event. One-hour tutorials are available in over 45 languages. No experience needed. Ages 4 to 104.” from hourofcode.com

To learn more about the Hour of Code, click here.

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Kindergarten: DrawingPumpkins Using a Sequence

Mrs. Lewis’ Kindergarten Class – How to Draw a Pumpkin

Quarter 2 – 2016

Kindergarten students learned to draw pumpkins using a sequence, the Wixie circle tool, the eraser tool, the paint bucket tool, and the text tool.  They also had to scroll to the correct program (Wixie) from the LS Resource Page, open Wixie, login to their Wixie account, and then open a new project.

Mrs. Ausbon’s Class – How to Draw a Pumpkin

  • Sequencing
  • Wixie Tools

Mrs. Brown’s Kindergarten 2016 – How to Draw a Pumpkin

  • Sequencing
  • Wixie tools

 

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2nd Grade – September 2016 – LS Computer Lab

Cynthia Fordham
cynthia.fordham@ravenscroft.org

2nd Grade – September 2016 – LS Computer Lab

Is being safe at a website the same as being safe in our real world?

How do you know when a website is good for you?

Are there times when you need to ask an adult before you visit a site?

screenshot-2016-09-27-at-8-17-08-pm

Students learn that they should stay safe online by choosing websites that are good for them to visit, and recognize sites that are not
right for them.
First, students learn about how staying safe in the real world and staying safe when visiting websites are really the same.
Next, they learn about the website traffic light and complete an activity using Wixie where they match statements about websites to the correct safety level of the site. Then they play an interactive game and consider how to determine which websites are just right for them.
commonsensemedia1

The Website Traffic Light
trafficlight

Green Sites
 

  • Are good
  • Fun
  • Just right
  • No chatting is happening

Yellow Sites – CAUTION!

  • You are not sure it is the right site
  • It might ask for your name, where you live, a phone number
  • You need to ask an adult if this is the right sight for you

Red Sites – Stay away! Stop!

I’m not sure how I got here…help!

Online Resources for Parents – Common Sense Media

Click the link above for Parent Resources.
common-sense-families

Basic Parts of the Computer

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What are the main parts of the computer?
What other devices do I use and how they are similar to the computers in our Lab?

Students reviewed the basic parts of the computer we use in our computer lab and created drawings to include:

  • CPU (Central Processing Unit)
  • Monitor
  • Keyboard
  • Mouse
  • Webcam
  • Headphones

Thanks so much!
Mrs. Fordham

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1st Grade – September 2016 – LS Computer Lab

1st Grade in the Computer Lab – September 2016

What are the main parts of the computer?
What other devices do I use and how they are similar to the computers in our Lab?

We used Kidspiration 3 and math tiles to show the six main parts of our computer:

1st-kidspiration-parts-of-computer
– Computer
– Monitor
– CPU – Central Processing Unit (off/on)
– Keyboard
– Mouse
– Webcam
– Headphones (headphone jack)

Students learn that they can go to exciting places online, but they need to follow certain rules to remain safe. By taking a virtual field trip, students experience the power of the Internet to take them to places they might not be able to visit in person. They learn that they should follow safety rules when they travel online, just as when traveling in the real world.
commonsensemedia1

screenshot-2016-09-26-at-9-09-37-pm

Three rules to follow when online:

  • Always ask your parent or teacher first
  • Only talk to people you know (your family or friends)
  • Stick to places that are just right for you

Online Resources for Parents – Common Sense Media common-sense-families

Click the link above for Parent Resources.

Thanks so much!

Mrs. Fordham

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Kindergarten-September 2016 – LS Computer Lab

Kindergarten in the Computer Lab – September 2016

How does a keyboard, monitor, CPU, mouse, webcam, and headphones help me to interact with a computer?

How is a PC computer in the Lab different from another device I may have?

k-legos-parts-of-computer

Kindergarten has been learning:
– The basic parts of the computers we use in the computer lab
– The basic parts of the computer by using Lego’s
– How the computer connects us to our “Online Neighborhood”

Students learn that they can go to exciting places online, but they need to follow certain rules to remain safe. By taking a virtual field trip, students experience the power of the Internet to take them to places they might not be able to visit in person. They learn that they should follow safety rules when they travel online, just as when traveling in the real world.
commonsensemedia1

screenshot-2016-09-26-at-9-09-37-pm

Three rules to follow when online:

  • Always ask your parent or teacher first
  • Only talk to people you know (your family or friends)
  • Stick to places that are just right for you

Online Resources for Parents – Common Sense Media common-sense-families

Click the link above for Parent Resources.

 

 

Thanks so much!

Mrs. Fordham
cynthia.fordham@ravenscroft.org

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3rd Grade – LS Computer Lab – September 2016

Mrs. Fordham – cynthia.fordham@ravenscroft.org3rd-grade-combo-lock

Digital Citizenship – Strong Passwords

How can a secure password help you
protect your private information?

  • Students in 3rd grade have completed digital citizenship lessons on “strong passwords”
  • identified the characteristics of strong passwords
  • applied characteristics of strong passwords to create new passwords
  • We have completed changing our passwords for the new school year

Here are some tips on how to make and use strong passwords.
Use Common Sense!

DOs

DO share your password only with your parents.
DO create passwords with at least six characters.
DO use combinations of letters, numbers, and symbols.
DO change your password regularly.

DON’Ts

DON’T give a password to anyone else – not even your friends.

DON’T use passwords that are easy for people you know to guess, like your nickname or your pet’s name.

DON’T use any private information in your password.

DON’T use a word in the dictionary as a password.

Lower School Digital Responsibility Use Policy (RUP)

Link to LS Digital Responsibility Use Policy:  lsdigitalresponsibleusepolicy

rup-2016-09-25-at-7-16-07-am

Students/parents have signed the Digital Responsible Use Policy(RUP) for this year.
A copy of our RUP is located in the student’s Google Drive technology folder:

  • Go to our LS Resource Page at: www2.ravenscroft.org/lowerschool
  • Student will click > Google Docs > and sign in to their Drive account
  • Choose Technology Folder > LS Digital Responsibility folder > Click open the RUP doc

Thank you so much!

Mrs. Fordham
September News from the LS Computer Lab

 

 

 

 

 

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4th Grade – LS Computer Lab – September 2016

Mrs. Fordham – cynthia.fordham@ravenscroft.org

Digital Citizenship – Strong Passwordscanstock11743298

  • Students in 4th grade have completed digital citizenship lessons on “strong passwords”
  • We have completed changing our passwords for the new school year

Strong Password Tips:
Use Common Sense!
Passwords should NOT have PRIVATE INFORMATION- for example:

  • Full (first and last) name        
  • Date of birth
  • Mother’s maiden name
  • Street address                         
  • School name or school address
  • Credit card numbers               
  • Phone numbers      
  • Social Security number

Ravenscroft Passwords must meet the following minimum requirements:

  • Not contain your account name or parts of your full name that exceed two consecutive characters
  • Be at least six characters in length
  • Contain characters from three of the following four categories:
  • English uppercase characters (A through Z)
  • English lowercase characters (a through z)
  • Base 10 digits (0 through 9)
  • Non-alphabetic characters (for example, !, $, #, %)

Lower School Digital Responsibility Use Policy (RUP)

Link to LS Digital Responsibility Use Policy:  lsdigitalresponsibleusepolicy

rup-2016-09-25-at-7-16-07-am

Students have e-signed our RUP and it is located in our Google Drive Technology Folder.

  • Parents sign the RUP as well – have your child:
  • Go to our LS Resource Page at: www2.ravenscroft.org/lowerschool
  • Student will click > Google Docs > and sign in to their Drive account
  • Choose Technology Folder > LS Digital Responsibility folder > Click open the RUP doc
  • Parents:
    • e-sign or type their first and last name
    • Add (e-signature) next to their typed name
    • Type the date
    • Close the document and all done
Note to Parents:
Haven’t “e-signed” your child’s Digital Responsible Use Policy(RUP) for this year?
Have your child open the RUP from their Google Drive>Technology Folder, and they will show you how to complete the e-signature.

Thank you so much!

Mrs. Fordham

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